Gumii Paarlaamaa Oromoo (GPO)

Oromo Parliamentarians Council (OPC)

 

Baga Nagaan Dhuftan!Welcome to Oromo parliamentarians council!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

              New Page 2 home                         

Tracing History Seventeen Oromo at Lovedale South Africa Returned to Oromia.

Contributions of Oromo Freed as Slaves and Trained at Lovedale


History can be forgotten in the memories of today, but if documented can reveal a great deal about ourselves and our people. Recentlly, GADA.com published an 
Afaan Oromo to Englsih dictionary by Edwin Foot and Liban Bultum published in 1913. The interesting finding by the editors was that Liban Bultum was one of many Oromo children who were abducted by slave traders with Abyssinian Emperor Menelik II and sold into slavery in 1888. A recent BBC article described Emperor Menelik II as the "greatest slave entrepreneur." Emperor Menelik II "taxed the trade to pay for guns and ammunition as he battled for control of the whole country, which he ruled from 1889 to 1913."

The journey of the Oromo children changed on September 16th, 1888, with the hlep of Commander Charles E Gissing, British gunship HMS Osprey. Commander Gissing freed the Oromo children from dhow slave ship heading towards slave markets in Arabian port of Jeddah.

 

 

Source: Cory Library, PIC/M 1093 “at

Lovedale (rescued from slavery in the Red Sea)” 

After their rescue, some of the children were taken to Aden Yemen where local families adopted children who were muslim. Many other children were taken to Free Church of Scottland. Eleven Oromo children at the Missionary died due to harsh weather, so the survivors were later taken to Lovedale Institution in South Africa's Eastern Cape. Below are some pictures of Oromo children at Lovedale.

 

 

 

 

Source: Cory Library, PIC/M 1093 “at

Lovedale (rescued from slavery in the Red Sea)”


The Journey of each Oromo child including place of abductions were detailed in the
Oromo Diaspora Narative by Sandra Rowoldt Shell (University of Cape Town). Liban Bulum and Bisho Jarso experiences after being freed has been documented in the Narrative. Recently, the BBC reported on Bisho Jarso and her grandson, the late Apartheid activist and scholar Mr Neville Alexander.

In that same BBC report, the author Sandra Rowoldt requested information on Oromo children who left Lovedale and returned to Oromia. Although over one hundred and twenty six years have passed and a great deal was lost from Oromo people including independence, a great deal can still be recovered through use of Oromo traditions of counting generations. Sandra is requesting history of eighteen names (including Liban Bultum), but we may have an opportunity to find out about the sixty four that survived and ended up in Lovedale as well as numerous children adopted in Aden Yemen.

It is common amoung many Oromo to count back seven to fourteen ancestors (males) on both sides of the family. The typical naming structure is with a child's last name being the father's first name and father's last name being the child's grandfather's first name. In doing so, a person counting back fourteen names can count back 200 to 250 years. This provides an opportunity to identify where the children ended up. Based on the case of Bisho Jarso, grandmother of Neville Alexander, the children are only four to five names back.

In order to assist in this process, I have listed the below names of children who returned to Oromia in 1909 along with places they were taken (source Oromo Diaspor Narratives). Please reach out to Gadaa.com and Sandra Rowoldt Shell if additional informaiton is available. 

·        Aguchello Chabani 

SON OF CHABANI AND GURDENFI

 Taken from Enge by Black Arabs, district of Barsinge in Shan country. Enge was scattered on slope of mountain called Belchori

·        Agude Bulcha

 SON OF BULCHA AND SANBATE

Taken from village called Chonge In Macca Province (Wallaga district)

·        Amanu Figgo

SON OF FIGGO AND ZAIDA.

Taken from Agam, in the Urbarage country, the king of which was

called Lallego.

·       Baki Malaka

SON OF MALAKKA AND MUJA

Taken from what is believed to be Seka in Jimma.   

·  Berille Boko Grant

DAUGHTER OF BOKO AND TURUNGI

Taken from a village near Gibbe River

·  Dinkitu Boensa

DAUGHTER OF BOENSA AND KURNI

Taken from a village called Garjeda in the Gindo country.

·       Fayesse Gemo

DAUGHTER OF GEMO AND YARACHI

Taken from a village called Upa in the Kaffa country

·  Fayissa Umbe

SON OF UMBE AND ASSETI

Taken from a village called Mangera, in

a country called Sayo

·       Galgal Dikko

SON OF DIKKO AND HUDO

Taken from a near Tibbe, West of Ambo 

·  Galgalli Shangalla

She was taken so young that she did not remember names of her parents

Taken from Kilema, in the Shangalla country.

·  Gamaches Garba

SON OF GARBA AND BADANI

Taken from a village called Kilerito, in a country called Liban, west of the river

Abaye

·  Gutama Tarafo

SON OF TARAFO AND GURO

Taken from a village Gamoje, in the Gera country

·  Hawe Sukute

DAUGHTER OF SUKUTE AND IBSE

From the village of Gani in the Garjeja country

·  Liban Bultum (worked with Edwin Foot in the First Afaan Oromo to English Dictionary)

Son of Bultum and Sumburi

Taken from Ilu country

 ·  Nagaro Chali

SON OF CHALI AND

Taken from Deko in the Dappo country 

·  Nuro Chabse

SON OF CHABSE AND SHOKACHI

Taken from Bita in the Kaffa country

 ·  Rufo Gangilla

SON OF GANGILA AND JORBO

Taken near the village called Tosa, in the district of Gera, between Jimma and Kaffa.

·  Tolassa Wayessa

SON OF WAYESSA AND HATATU

Taken from Jimma in the Tibbe country

Posted

 

                                                              Copyright ©2008 GPO/OPC Allrights Reserved